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Dallisgrass

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Dallisgrass plants form loose bunches that grow from 1 to 5 feet (about 1.5 m) tall. Plants grow from prostrate with erect tips to totally erect. The leaf sheath is somewhat flattened and its base is hairy, often tinged red, and usually inflated. The underground stems are fairly short and have areas that appear as concentric rings. Dallisgrass can be distinguished from tall fescue, Festuca arundinacea, which forms clumps rather than loose bunches. Also similar in appearance is knotgrass, Paspalum distichum, which does not have the flattened stems and hairless stem joints (nodes) of dallisgrass; rather, it has rounded stems and hairy nodes. In mowed sites, such as lawns and recreational fields, if may be confused with crabgrass but crabgrass leaves are soft whereas dallisgrass leaves are stiffer.

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Dandelion

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Dandelions are a persistent weed problem. Each seed head of a mature plant produces thousands of weed seeds that float easily in the breeze. So if anyone in your immediate vacinity has dandelions, you can count on you having them too.

 

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Fescue Clumps

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Fescue clumps are long-lived, clump-forming perennial grass producing broad, coarse leaves up to 18 inches tall that will persist throughout the year unless the summers are too dry, when it may go dormant. Cool-season grasses such as tall fescue resume vegetative growth in the fall and remain green over winter, though they only make wintertime growth when the soil temperature is above 40 degrees. In late spring, the clumps flower and send up a number of 3-foot-long flowering spikes, which produce the seeds.

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Fireweed

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Fireweed is a common, leafy, annual broad leaf weed that germinates after April 1st across the Southeast. It grows quickly, which is why weed management is both crucial and difficult. Fireweed can appear in massive numbers that will seem to be taking over the lawn. This weed grows from the thatch layer in warm season lawns (Bermuda and Zoysia) and is able to live above the previously established pre-emergent barrier in your turf that Absolute Green applies. Since fireweed can’t root in properly, regular mowing and increased seasonal heat will cause it to dry up and prevent it from taking over a lawn. While our broad leaf weed sprays will help with weed management, it may continue to germinate for a few months until the temperatures finally wear it out. In the end, this weed is a seasonal nuisance that won’t have a lasting presence in your lawn.

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Ground Ivy

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Ground ivy is also is called gill-over-the-ground and creeping charlie. This perennial member of the mint family is a weed problem in turf and ornamentals. It has a blue flower. One of the better identification features is the scalloped edge of the round leaves. Acting as a vine it moves out from underneath trees and shrubs and creeps across the grass area rooting from the nodes as it travels. Herbicides control it in the lawn but it soon reinfests from the tree and shrub areas.

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