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Broadleaf Plantain

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Broadleaf plantain, normally a perennial, sometimes behaves as an annual. It is a problem in lawns and sometimes in thin alfalfa and pastures as well as christmas trees. It is a low growing plant with large leaves.

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Fireweed

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Fireweed is a common, leafy, annual broad leaf weed that germinates after April 1st across the Southeast. It grows quickly, which is why weed management is both crucial and difficult. Fireweed can appear in massive numbers that will seem to be taking over the lawn. This weed grows from the thatch layer in warm season lawns (Bermuda and Zoysia) and is able to live above the previously established pre-emergent barrier in your turf that Absolute Green applies. Since fireweed can’t root in properly, regular mowing and increased seasonal heat will cause it to dry up and prevent it from taking over a lawn. While our broad leaf weed sprays will help with weed management, it may continue to germinate for a few months until the temperatures finally wear it out. In the end, this weed is a seasonal nuisance that won’t have a lasting presence in your lawn.

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Henbit

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The plant is called Henbit (Lamium amplexicaule). Members of the Lamium genus can run the gamut from annuls to perennials and from wanted to unwanted plants. In this case Henbit is usually considered a weed. It usually pops up in early spring in lawns, flower & shrub beds.

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Poa Annua

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Poa Annua is a common weed of cultivation, known in the Americas as annual bluegrass. It occurs as a common constituent of lawns, where it is also often treated as a weed, and grows on waste ground. However, it is sometimes the most suitable lawn grass for many sites, and can form most of the entire grass sward in some lawns. On lawns it grows better in rich soils, but is usually small enough to be overlooked. It does not compete with other plants. Many golf putting greens, including the famously fast Oakmont Country Club greens, are planted with this grass, although many courses have converted to bentgras.

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