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Henbit

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The plant is called Henbit (Lamium amplexicaule). Members of the Lamium genus can run the gamut from annuls to perennials and from wanted to unwanted plants. In this case Henbit is usually considered a weed. It usually pops up in early spring in lawns, flower & shrub beds.

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Nutsedge

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Sedge stems are erect and hairless. Although sedge leaves superficially resemble grass leaves, they lack collars, ligules, and auricles. Sedge leaves are thicker and stiffer than most grasses, are V-shaped in cross-section, and arranged in sets of three from the base rather than sets of two as found in grass leaves. Sedge stems are triangular in cross-section; grass stems are hollow and round. Yellow nutsedge stems grow to 3 feet (0.9 m) tall and its leaves are light green, and have pointed tips. Purple nutsedge stems grow to 1-1/3 feet (0.4 m) tall and have dark green leaves with rounded leaf tips. Tubers of yellow nutsedge are produced singly while purple nutsedge tubers are produced in chains, with several on a single rhizome.

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Oxalis

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Leaves, alternate, divided into three partly-folded, deeply cut, heart-shaped lobes. Foliage with sour, acrid taste. Flowers, bright yellow, with five petals, on stalk bent below the fruit attached to a common point. Fruit a narrow “okra-like”capsule. In addition to being an unsightly weed, this plant has been known to harbor pests such as whiteflies and spider mites.

Oxalis has two properties that make it particularly problematical. One is the vigorous network of bulbs that it develops, rendering ineffective, hand or mechanical weeding. Secondly, while most perennial weeds are active during the summer, the primary growing season for Oxalis is the winter.

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Poa Annua

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Poa Annua is a common weed of cultivation, known in the Americas as annual bluegrass. It occurs as a common constituent of lawns, where it is also often treated as a weed, and grows on waste ground. However, it is sometimes the most suitable lawn grass for many sites, and can form most of the entire grass sward in some lawns. On lawns it grows better in rich soils, but is usually small enough to be overlooked. It does not compete with other plants. Many golf putting greens, including the famously fast Oakmont Country Club greens, are planted with this grass, although many courses have converted to bentgras.

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Quackgrass

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This is a perennial that reproduces by seed and rhizomes. The leaf blade is broader, grows faster, taller and is a lighter green in colour than the rest of your lawn. Quackgrass can spread quickly giving your lawn an uneven appearance. It produces seed heads from June to September.

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